Paloma books in libraries

You can check these out today!

Library of Congress
Close Apart by Robert Cowan (poetry)
Shellback by Jeanne-Marie Osterman (poetry)*
Seven Skirts by Jacki Rigoni (poetry)
The Good Mother of Marseille by Christopher X. Shade (novel)
Shield the Joyous by Christopher X. Shade (poetry)
The Ruin of Everything by Lara Stapleton (short stories)
Pagpag: The Dictator’s Aftermath in the Diaspora by Eileen R. Tabios
Humanity: An Anthology, volume 1 edited by Eileen R. Tabios (essays)
One, Two, Three: Selected Hay(na)ku Poems by Eileen R. Tabios (poetry)

CALIFORNIA

Daly City Public Library
Diaspora: Volume L by Ivy Alvarez (poetry) 
Glimpses by Leny Mendoza Strobel (essays)
Pagpag: The Dictator’s Aftermath in the Diaspora by Eileen R. Tabios (short stories)
Marcelina by Jean Vengua (poetry)

San Francisco Public Library
Diaspora: Volume L by Ivy Alvarez (poetry)
Marawi by Albert E. Alejo & Eileen R. Tabios (poetry chapbook)
peminology by Melinda Luisa de Jesus (poetry)
After Irma, After Harvey: A Fundraiser on Behalf of Animals by Lisa Suguitan Melnick et al (chapbook)
Seven Skirts by Jacki Rigoni (poetry)
The Ruin of Everything by Lara Stapleton (short stories)
Glimpses by Leny Mendoza Strobel (essays)
The Great American Novel: Selected Visual Poetry 2001-2019 by Eileen R. Tabios (poetry) 
Humanity: An Anthology, volume 1 edited by Eileen R. Tabios (essays)
Manhattan: An Archaeology by Eileen R. Tabios (poetry)
One, Two, Three: Selected Hay(na)ku Poems by Eileen R. Tabios (poetry)

San Mateo County Libraries
Seven Skirts by Jacki Rigoni (poetry)
Humanity: An Anthology, volume 1 edited by Eileen R. Tabios (essays) 

South San Francisco Public Library
Humanity: An Anthology, volume 1 edited by Eileen R. Tabios (essays)

Stanford Libraries
Blue by Reme Grefalda & Wesley St. Jo (poetry)
Humanity: An Anthology, volume 1 edited by Eileen R. Tabios (essays)
One, Two, Three: Selected Hay(na)ku Poems by Eileen R. Tabios (poetry)

NEW YORK

New York Public Library
Shellback by Jeanne-Marie Osterman (poetry)
The Ruin of Everything by Lara Stapleton (short stories)

Poets House
Diaspora: Volume L by Ivy Alvarez
Humors by Joel Chace
Close Apart by Robert Cowan
My Beauty is an Occupiable Space: 37 Prosed Sonnets by Anne Gorrick & John Bloomberg-Rissman
peminology by Melinda Luisa de Jesus
After Irma, After Harvey: A Fundraiser on Behalf of Animals by Lisa Suguitan Melnick et al (chapbook)
Shield the Joyous by Christopher X. Shade
Anne with an E & Me by Wesley St. Jo
Blue by Wesley St. Jo & Reme Grefalda
The Great American Novel: Selected Visual Poetry 2001-2019 by Eileen R. Tabios
Manhattan: An Archaeology by Eileen R. Tabios
Marawi by Eileen R. Tabios & Albert E. Alejo (chapbook)
One, Two, Three: Selected Hay(na)ku Poems by Eileen R. Tabios

*Gratitude also to the following libraries for acquiring a copy of Jeanne-Marie Osterman’s ShellbackYale Club Library, NYC; Albert Wisner Public Library, NY; Gonzaga U Library, Spokane; Everett High School Library, Everett, Washington; Everett Public Library.

Luisa A. Igloria reviews MARCELINA

“[Marcelina] is a 31-page sequence weaving [Jean] Vengua’s own visits to Stockton and the Jersey Island delta, with rumors of the crime, ghost stories circulating in the community, and fragments of news reports from 1933 that also capture the economic and social tensions seething under the surface…

What strikes me most in this reading of Marcelina, however, is the careful way Vengua gathers inchoate bits of story like someone panning for clearer residue.” (Luisa A. Igloria)

Read the full review here.

The Halo-Halo Review is edited by Eileen R. Tabios. Check out Issue 11 here.

Elsa Valmidiano reviews Marcelina

From POETRY NORTHWEST:

Jean Vengua, a daughter of the Manong generation, was born in San Francisco, raised in Santa Cruz, and lives in Monterey. Marcelina, a long epic poem recently published as a chapbook, begins with a quote from Carlos Bulosan: “And perhaps it was this narrowing of your life into an island. . . .” For those unfamiliar with Bulosan, he is what a Filipino-American pupil might call the Godfather of Filipino-American Literature. Bulosan is honored for writing about the experiences of Filipinos working as laborers in the US during the 1930s and 40s, when Celine Navarro, a young Filipina immigrant—the subject of Vengua’s book—was murdered by her Filipino community. The reasons behind Navarro’s murder are never made clear in Marcelina, but in it Vengua takes the reader through an extended examination of that era’s Filipino community in the US, revealing the terrorism and violence inflicted on the community by white society. She reveals, as well, the misogyny within a Filipino community that resulted in Navarro’s death: members of her own community buried her alive as punishment or retribution for either being an adulteress or informer to the police. Eighty-nine years after her death, still none of us know the reason for it, a mystery which is further compounded by the lack of historical accountability for the terrorism inflicted on the Filipino community, as well as the acquittal of Navarro’s killers…

Continue reading here.

Maileen Hamto reviews MARCELINA

From THE HALO-HALO REVIEW:

Whispers of hauntings always bring back stories of near-forgotten suffering, trauma buried deep into a community’s collective memory. Jean Vengua’s chapbook, Marcelina: A Meditation on the Murder of Cecilia “Celing” Navarro,” is the vessel of remembering for a new generation of Filipino-Americans to revisit an agonizing chapter in our history. Continue reading here.

Pushcart Prize Nominees

We’re very pleased to announce our 2021 PUSHCART PRIZE nominees!

MARCELINA
From Marcelina by Jean Vengua (September 2020)

WHILE YOU REST
From Shield the Joyous by Christopher X. Shade (April 2020)

THE LAWNMOWER
From Shield the Joyous by Christopher X. Shade (April 2020)

IN THE ALABAMA TOWN WHERE I GREW UP, THE TOWN SQUARE WASN’T A SQUARE. 
From Shield the Joyous by Christopher X. Shade (April 2020)

ON IMITATING A RHINOCEROS 
From PAGPAG: The Dictator’s Aftermath in the Diaspora by Eileen R. Tabios (March 2020)

DO NOT BREATHE
From PAGPAG: The Dictator’s Aftermath in the Diaspora by Eileen R. Tabios (March 2020)

Congratulations and good luck!