browngirlbooklover interview with Lara Stapleton

Leslie-Ann Murray (@browngirlbooklover) interviews Lara Stapleton

BGBL: Why is diversity in the literary industry important?

LS: “I like what Shonda Rhimes said about it, “It’s normalizing.” Part of being humane is understanding that everybody’s stories are important.

People of privilege think that their expensive education gives them more of a right to these stories than others, and at the same time not they don’t really support societal shifts that give people enough education and confidence to easily take ownership over their stories.

Diversity in literature is important because human beings are important and because there are so many interesting stories to be told.”

Watch the interview here.

Lara Stapleton at SFPL

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The Ruin of Everything by Lara Stapleton is a San Francisco Public Library Filipino American History Month recommended title! Click here for SFPL’s full list of titles.

HOT OFF THE PRESS hosted by Cecilia Manguerra Brainard and co-sponsored by the San Francisco Public Library and the Philippine American Writers and Artists, Inc., will be streamed live on Saturday, October 9 at 5pm Pacific, via YouTube. Register here to join the webinar.

The Hot Off the Press (HOTP) Literary Reading, a program which is part of the Filipino American International Book Festival. Hosted and Moderated by author Cecilia Manguerra Brainard, Hot Off the Press Literary Readings have been showcasing Filipino and FilAm authors and their new books since 2011.

This year’s HOTP Literary Reading includes nine Filipino and Filipino American authors: Gina Apostol, Jhoanna Lynn Cruz, George Gonzaga Deoso, Caroline Sy Hau, Mae Respicio, Randy Ribay, Brian Ascalon Roley, Ricco Siasoco and Lara Stapleton.

Alfred Yuson reviews The Ruin of Everything

Award-winning writer and literary critic Alfred A. Yuson reviews Lara Stapleton’s The Ruin of Everything:

“…Stapleton appears to have set out to navigate crisscrossing lives by simply allowing the characters, especially the I-persona, to adjudicate between everyday instances of hope and anguish… The navigation is skillfully conducted through shifting maps of loneliness, angst, and the occasional ruin of everything. The inherent intricacies develop a matrix of resultant debris that keeps the story-telling in the throes of deep engagement.” Read full review here.

Hot Off the Press features 9 FilAm authors

The Hot Off the Press (HOTP) Literary Reading, a program of the Filipino American International Book Festival, will be via Zoom this year. The event, sponsored by the San Francisco Public Library and PAWA will be held on Saturday, October 9, 2021, 5–6:30 p.m. PT. 

Hosted and Moderated by author Cecilia Manguerra Brainard, Hot Off the Press Literary Readings have been showcasing Filipino and FilAm authors and their new books since 2011.

This year’s HOTP Literary Reading includes nine Filipino and Filipino American authors: Gina Apostol, Jhoanna Lynn Cruz, George Gonzaga Deoso, Caroline Sy Hau, Mae Respicio, Randy Ribay, Brian Ascalon Roley, Ricco Siasoco, and Lara Stapleton.

Register here or Watch on YouTube.

Flesh & Blood Book Party for TRoE!

It’s a Flesh and Blood book party!
October 22, 7:00PM Eastern
VON 3 Bleecker @ Bowery NYC

in celebration of the release of Lara Stapleton’s THE RUIN OF EVERYTHING!

Also featuring:

Ligaya Mishan, writer for The New York Times and T Magazine, and co-author with Chef Angela Dimayuga, of Filipinx: Heritage Recipes from the Diaspora

and

Nerissa S. Balce, Asian American Studies scholar and author of Body Parts of Empire

Reader review of The Ruin of Everything

Do you look for faces of people you know when you read? Or do you meander and pause in amusement when you recognize a face in a different name? Do you look for yourself?

This collection of short stories by Stapleton — her second — offers more than a dozen characters at the center and in peripherals who are at once distant and familiar. But the center, which often cannot hold, shifts constantly. There are hipsters and hitchers, blesseds and bastards, stars and solitaries, nurturing traumas and aspirations, regrets and redemptions.

Stapleton often eschews the traditional arc of storytelling. Some read like expanded character sketches, though the story is IN the characters. This is not to say the narratives lack emotions — they are embedded in each character, affirmed or denied by their respective coteries. After all, aren’t we the sum of all lives we touched and denied?

Stapleton reminds us that though sometimes each of us may be an island, we are only part and parcel of an archipelago. And if it’s true that it takes a village to raise a child, the same is true in creating a ruin.

—Victor Velasco